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© Trent Nelson
(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) A sign at the door of a meetinghouse of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Layton requests that people wear masks, on Wednesday, July 15, 2020.

Another 413 Utahns have tested positive for COVID-19, and seven more deaths are being attributed to the disease in the state, the Utah Department of Health reported Wednesday.

The rolling seven-day average for cases — the metric public-health professionals use to monitor trends in the disease’s spread — dropped Wednesday to 589 per day. That average peaked at more than 651 per day on Monday.

The seven fatalities reported bring the overall death toll to 233. The seven Utahns whose deaths were reported are:

• A Davis County man, between the ages of 65 and 84, who was hospitalized when he died.

• A Salt Lake County man, between 65 and 84, who was not in the hospital when he died.

• A Salt Lake County man, between 45 and 64, who was hospitalized when he died.

• A San Juan County woman, older than 85, who was in a long-term care facility.

• A Utah County woman, between 65 and 84, who was not in the hospital when she died.

• A Weber County man, between 45 and 64, who was not in the hospital when he died.

• A Weber County man, between 65 and 84, who was hospitalized when he died.

In a statement, UDOH officials pointed out that the deaths the agency reports each day have not happened within the last 24 hours. Usually, there is a lag time of between 2 and 7 days when the state reports someone’s death — sometimes longer if a Utah resident dies out of state.

The agency does not list death dates in its report, citing privacy reasons. “It would be too easy to potentially identify an individual,” UDOH said, if one were given a person’s county of residence, general age, gender and date of death.

The seven fatalities bring the seven-day total of deaths reported to 32 — 10 of them on Tuesday.

UDOH reported that 204 people were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Tuesday. (Hospitalization figures lag behind case counts by a day.) There have been 1,913 people hospitalized with COVID-19 since the first cases were reported in March; 25 of them entered the hospital Tuesday.

Another 7,559 tests for COVID-19 were performed in a day, according to Wednesday’s report, bringing the total number of tests to 432,080. The rolling seven-day average for percent of positive lab tests is 10.13%.

Wednesday’s new cases brings the state’s total of cases, since the pandemic began, to 30,891. Of those, the state considers 18,593 people to be “recovered” — defined by public-health officials as staying alive three weeks after being diagnosed.

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